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Trees That Can Be Planted Close to Houses: 12 Best Choices

Trees That Can Be Planted Close to Houses: 12 Best Choices

When designing a garden, careful thought should be given to the location of trees.

While trees can provide shade and beautiful views when near your house, the wrong kind of tree in close proximity to your house can negatively impact your home.

Because of this, you need to be thoughtful about the best tree to plant close to your house.

Which trees can be planted close to houses? Trees with small, noninvasive root systems are best to plant close to your house to avoid any foundational damage. Trees that mature to a height of 25 feet or less, don’t pose any safety risks, provide year-round beauty, and are easy to clean up after are great choices. 

Choosing the right trees for your home requires you to pick specimens that look beautiful and do not negatively impact the structure or foundation of your house.

Read on to learn about several trees that may be just what you are looking for.

12 Best Trees To Plant Near Houses

When choosing a tree to plant near your house, you should always keep the needs of your property in mind. Here are some trees that generally work well in most circumstances.

Consider these as you pick trees for your property.

1. Japanese Maple 

A Japanese maple tree in autumn covered with brilliant red leaves.

There are several types of Japanese Maples. These small trees tend to have reddish-orange leaves, beautiful autumn foliage, and a delicate, graceful trunk.

  • Average Mature Size: 8-30 feet tall
  • Best for Grow Zones: 5-8
  • Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

2. Flowering Dogwood

A mature white dogwood tree in full bloom in front of a home.

This beautiful North American native produces white flowers. The trees are easy to care for, and they require very little pruning.

  • Average Mature Size: 10-25 feet tall and a diameter of 6-12 inches
  • Best for Grow Zones: 2-9
  • Growth Rate: 1 foot per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

3. Crabapple 

A mature crabapple tree covered in pink blossoms.

This tree may not have the best reputation, but it is a much better choice than you may think.

You can get a lot of enjoyment from this tree all year round, especially when it bursts into bloom in the spring.

  • Average Mature Size: 15-20 feet tall and wide
  • Best for Grow Zones: 4-8
  • Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

4. American Holly

An up-close look at the branches of the American holly tree.

This evergreen is a great choice if you want year-round privacy. The beautiful, glossy leaves and red berries are some of this tree’s beautiful features. 

  • Average Mature Size: 25-60 feet tall
  • Best for Grow Zones: 5-9
  • Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Evergreen

5. American Hornbeam

Close look at the branches and flowers of the American hornbeam tree.

If you love unique leaves, you may like the American hornbeam. This tree produces beautiful seeds and has a pleasing shape that is easy to maintain.

  • Average Mature Size: 20-40 feet tall, 20-30 feet wide
  • Best for Grow Zones: 3-9
  • Growth Rate: 1 foot per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous  

6. Eastern Redbud 

Two Eastern redbud trees covered in pink blooms.

The Eastern redbud is a beautiful and delicate tree with plenty of small pink blooms in the spring. 

  • Average Mature Size: 15-30 feet tall, 15-25 feet wide
  • Best for Grow Zones: 4-8
  • Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

7. Pawpaw 

A small pawpaw tree growing among boxwoods.

If you love the tropical look, this fruiting tree may be exactly what you want in your yard. 

  • Average Mature Size: 15 feet tall, 15 feet wide
  • Best for Grow Zones: 5-9
  • Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

8. Loquat 

A loquat tree with fruit on a sunny day.

This unique tree offers interest all year long with its colorful leaves and beautiful small white flowers.

  • Average Mature Size: 15-25 feet tall and wide
  • Best for Grow Zones: 9-11
  • Growth Rate: 1.5 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Evergreen

9. Rose of Sharon 

A small rose of Sharon tree blooming near a house.

This small, easy-to-grow option offers beautiful flowers throughout the summer and does well in a variety of conditions.

  • Average Mature Size: 8-12 feet tall, 6-10 feet wide
  • Best for Grow Zones: 5-9
  • Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

10. Crepe Myrtle 

Arching branches and pink flowers of the crepe myrtle.

This small tree has pink, crepe-like flowers and beautiful green foliage during the spring and summer. 

  • Average Mature Size: 15-25 feet tall, 6-15 feet wide
  • Best for Grow Zones: 6-9
  • Growth Rate: 2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

11. Serviceberry 

A serviceberry tree blooming in a park.

A true delight during all seasons, the serviceberry tree grows lovely white flowers in the spring, and its leaves turn beautiful shades in the fall.

  • Average Mature Size: 15-25 feet tall and wide.
  • Best for Grow Zones: 4-8 
  • Growth Rate: 1-2 feet per year
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Deciduous

12. Dwarf Fruit Trees

Peach trees covered with pink blossoms.

There are many different types of dwarf fruit trees. From olive trees to apple trees, you can get a beautiful garden component and a snack at the same time. 

  • Average Mature Size: 8-10 feet tall
  • Best for Grow Zones: This depends on the tree, though some trees may work from 3-9
  • Growth Rate: Full size in 1-2 years
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: Both, depending on the type

Considerations When Selecting Trees To Plant Close to Your House 

There are many features you should look for in a tree when planting one close to your house. Always keep your own house’s needs in mind when deciding. 

  • Root System: The best tree to plant near your home is one with a small yet stable root system. Larger root systems can impact your foundation, and unstable root systems can put your house at risk from a falling tree.
  • Cleanup: Too much natural material on your roof can damage your roof health. Certain trees, such as the linden, can attract bugs. 
  • Growth Rate and Mature Size: Pay attention to the projected mature height of a tree that you get. One that is too large can hurt your home and foundation.
  • Deciduous or Evergreen: An evergreen tree provides more year-round privacy and shade than a deciduous tree. 
  • Safety: Some trees, such as cottonwood trees, have a shallow root system that leaves them vulnerable to rotting and instability during storms.
  • Shade: Some shade can be a welcome side effect of a tree near your home. However, keep in mind that a shady tree will require you to plant shade-friendly plants underneath. 

Which Trees Should Not Be Planted Close to a House 

Several trees should be avoided to ensure the health of your foundation. Some of these trees include ash, oak, and poplar trees.

Each of these trees will try to grow in or under your foundation. You should also not plant willows too close to your house since their root systems seek out pipes. 

Related Questions: 

What Is the Best Tree To Plant Near a House for Shade? 

The answer to this will depend a lot on your unique situation and the needs of your home.

In general, opt for a small tree that will not get too big, such as a Japanese Maple or an ornamental fruit tree.  

What Are the Best Evergreen Trees To Plant Near a House? 

Some of the best evergreen trees to plant near your house include American Holly, Bronze Loquat, and some fruit trees. 

Conclusion

A tree near your house can offer many benefits, including shade, beauty, and privacy, and it can even improve your property values.

While this decision may seem overwhelming, there are plenty of ways to narrow down your options. Use the information above to help you choose the perfect tree to plant near your house.